Tag Archives: MarieLynnHammond

A Concert in Your Living Room?

Marie-Lynn Hammond

By Marie-Lynn Hammond

This past Sunday I and two musician friends played a concert, had a fabulous time, and even made a bit of money – all without tickets, posters, hall rental, noisy bar patrons, or big, complicated sound equipment. How’d we manage that?

It’s a House Concert!
Because the show took place in a private home – it’s called a house concert. In the last few years the media have discovered them; I’ve seen articles in major newspapers and heard a radio doc about the phenomenon. But they’ve been around much longer than that. I played my first house concert with my old band, Stringband, in Thunder Bay, around 1981 or 1982.

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York Region Musicians at Winterfolk!

Marie-Lynn Hammond

By: Marie-Lynn Hammond

Four musicians from the region will be showcased at Winterfolk, the roots/folk/blues fest in downtown TO, on Sunday, 20 February, at 1 p.m. at the Black Swan pub, 154 Danforth. Details here. It’s a FREE, not-for-profit festival, happening all week long in various venues on the Danforth, though donations are certainly welcome to help pay the musicians.

The Performers

And yes, I’m one of the four performers showcasing, so as a typically modest, self-effacing Canadian (other than Don Cherry, that is), I sincerely apologize for what may seem like shameless self-promotion, something we really just don’t approve of, do we?!

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Research for a Song?

Marie-Lynn Hammond

By: Marie-Lynn Hammond

Yes, I’m doing research for a song. Because not all songs are about the writer’s navel-gazing feelings, or about love, that bottomless pit of inspiration (and too often cliché) for songwriters.

I love writing songs on unusual topics and songs that tell stories. If they tell a Canadian story, even better. So I’m now writing one about the Sharon Temple (www.sharontemple.ca), a unique heritage site in the north of York Region.

The temple, completed in 1832, was built by a fascinating sect called the Children of Peace. You could say they were the first hippies: they valued peace, social justice and equality; they lived together cooperatively in one village; they held feasts where everyone shared food; they wore colourful clothing when they marched in processions; and music and song were a big part of their worship.

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